IOM trains personnel on combating Human Trafficking

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The International Organization for Migration has conducted a five-day training for 41 Sierra Leonean Law Enforcement Personnel in Makeni.

IOM conducted the training because officials on the frontline on the fight against human trafficking are not sufficiently trained in human trafficking case management.

The training was done in collaboration with the Ministry of Social Welfare Gender and Children’s Affairs, and the United Nations Migration Agency.

Alhaji Sanusi Tejan Savage, Head of the IOM Office in Sierra Leone, “IOM is committed to working with the Government of Sierra Leone to address emerging trends in human trafficking in the country. This includes strengthening the capacity of both government agencies and civil society organizations.”

The personnel received expert training on how to identify, report investigate and persecute human trafficking cases.

Various law enforcement agencies participated in the training workshop, they included the Sierra Leone Police, Legal and Justice Department, Trans-National Organization Crime Unit, Family Support Unit, Interpol, Office of National Security and the Immigration Department. Other participants included Civil Societies working against human trafficking.Francis Kabia Director of Social Welfare at the MSWGCA said that, “successful convictions are contingent on the collective efforts of those who identify the victims, those who investigate and those who prosecute the alleged perpetrators. This can only happen when all the actors involved have some mastery of their responsibilities.”“This training is timely and appropriate especially for the trend in Tips across our borders”, affirmed Mr Joseph A. Bunting who represented the Office of National Security at the training. “Our collaborative efforts in combating the crime are indispensable and the systematic approach in mitigating crimes of this nature as presented in the training provides us with the opportunity to learn and optimize their institutional resources in addressing this in our country”, he added.In 2005, the Sierra Leone government enacted the Anti-Human Trafficking Act No.7 of 2005 which officially made human trafficking an offence. Notwithstanding that, a considerable number of Sierra Leoneans have been trafficked into possible sexual slavery or forced labour.
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